Dr. Duiven is a Licensed Psychologist who serves the Denver area. His work is based on the view that psychotherapy provides an opportunity to learn to live fully in the present, with a strong sense of self, and with the capacity to have deeply satisfying relationships. The process involves interactive inquiry into, and empathic resonance with, the unique life experiences of each person. As relationship patterns, the management of anxiety, and significant life events are explored, suffering is often relieved, and there is an increase in self understanding and personal freedom.

Licensed Psychologist Serving Lakewood, CO & The Entire Denver Area.

dr_duiven

Personal Bio

My interest in psychology has always been on learning to be an effective psychotherapist with a wide range of people. I felt it was important to have a solid grounding in psychodynamic training because I believe it offers an in-depth, comprehensive understanding of how the mind operates and how it can be healed when it is out of balance.

I completed my Doctorate in Clinical Psychology at the Unversity of Denver in 1984, with a focus on traditional psychological assessment and psychodynamic psychotherapy. To deepen my understanding of self-psychology, which is a specific type of psychodynamic psychology, I later participated for two years in a post-doctoral study group at the Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis. This group was led by Ernest Wolf, M.D., and the late Marion Tolpin, M.D.; two of the foremost experts in self-psychology.

I have been practicing traditional psychotherapy as a Licensed Psychologist since 1987. After being in practice for several years, I began to develop a strong interest in spiritual growth and development, and how to integrate this into psychotherapy with patients who are interested in doing so. I now call this process contemplative psychotherapy, and while I continue to do a great deal of traditional psychotherapy, I have also found that many people want to include the contemplative dimension in their psychotherapy.My preparation for this work occurred in part through individual work with a meditation teacher and an interfaith spiritual director, and also through seminars, workshops, and independent study. The most important part of this training, however, has been through twenty-five years of my own meditation practice. From this, I have come to appreciate the value of a calm, practiced awareness for cultivating one’s connection to the sacred, which is sometimes called presence. As this state of presence deepens and becomes more frequent, it helps relieve suffering and leads to an increase in personal freedom in a wide range of circumstances.

As a contemplative psychotherapist, I strive to maintain this subtle state of presence while working with patients, and to bring it into the shared space of the therapeutic relationship. The therapeutic process can often be greatly enhanced when it includes this contemplative dimension.